Does Pyrrole Disorder Affect Your Energy, Stress or Mood?

Stress

Pyrrole disorder, pyrroluria or “Mauve Factor” was first identified in the 1950s by Dr Abram Hoffer. Some people have persistent elevated levels due to abnormal haemoglobin metabolism or synthesis. Elevated pyrroles have been linked with mood disorders such as bipolar disorder, anxiety and depression. Stress, nutritional deficiency, and heavy metals such as lead and mercury can significantly increase pyrrole levels.

What is Pyrrole disorder and who gets it?

Pyrrole disorder, pyrroluria or “Mauve Factor” was first identified in the 1950s by Dr Abram Hoffer, Dr Humphrey Osmond and Dr Carl Pfeiffer.Pyrroles are a by-product of haemoglobin synthesis.  Most people have low levels of pyrroles at any given time, but some people have persistent elevated levels due to abnormal haemoglobin metabolism or synthesis.

Elevated pyrroles have been linked with mood disorders such as bipolar disorder, anxiety and depression. This condition affects up to 10 per cent of the population but is more common in people with psychological, learning or behavioural problems.

There is a genetic basis to this condition. For example, if one parent has pyrrole disorder, then there is a fifty per cent chance that it may be passed onto a child. However genes alone do not guarantee pyrroluria. Genes need to be switched on and off. Many factors are responsible for switching these genes on and off, including stress, nutritional deficiency, and heavy metals such as lead and mercury that significantly increase pyrrole levels.

A combination of anxiety and high copper on a hair mineral test increase the diagnostic possibility that someone is suffering from pyrroluria.

Symptoms reflect nutrient deficiency

Pyrroles bind vitamin B6 and Zinc making them unavailable for use by the body. Biotin, magnesium and manganese are also affected.

Symptoms may therefore include:

Poor dream recall

White spots on nails

Stretch marks

Digestive problems

Anxiety

Mood swings

Sensitivity to noise and bright lights.

What tests are available?

A urine “mauve factor” test is the “gold standard’ used to diagnose pyrroluria. Hair mineral analysis is a good screening test that may show high copper and low zinc. Toxic metals such as mercury, lead and arsenic may also show up. Blood tests measuring copper, caeruloplasmin and zinc may also be useful.

Treatment of pyrrole disorder

If you do have pyrrole disorder, there are a number of things that we can do.

Supplements such as Vitamin B6, Magnesium, Manganese, Biotin, Vitamin C and essential fatty acids are all great ways to support the immune system and supplement any deficiencies caused by the pyrrole.

Additionally, digestive advice and treatment to repair intestinal permeability and improve nutrient absorption and detoxification of heavy metals such as lead and mercury can be of great assistance.

Lastly, since many of the symptoms relate to mood and energy, stress management is a really important thing to address as well since emotional stress is associated with increased pyrrole excretion.

Wishing you great health,

Dr Pete

PS you are welcome to share this information with friends and family

About Dr Pete

Dr Peter Holsman is a qualified Medical Practitioner, Naturopath and Professional Speaker based in Melbourne. An expert in his field with over 30 years experience, he specialises in treating people with fatigue related illnesses including anxiety, stress, depression, chronic fatigue syndrome, digestive concerns, menopause, thyroid and adrenal hormone problems.

Other blogs you might be interested in

Is your home making you more anxious?

This blog discusses how to make your home calming and tranquil. Read on ....

Read More

Cultivating happiness

This blog describes 5 simple ways of creating happiness....

Read More

Welcome to 2018!

Welcome to a New Year of possibilities and an opportunuity to review your goals and resolutions. Read more...

Read More

Is stress getting the better of you?

Stress is a big problem for many people. Click below to find out more.

Read More

How the weather can affect your mood and wellbeing

This blog post discusses how the weather can affect your mood. Click below to read more.

Read More

Stand up and protect yourself from the harms of desk jobs

This blog post discusses what you need to know about healthy work posture. Click below to read more.

Read More

How yoga can reduce stress

Yoga has been proven to have a really positive effect in reducing stress as well as improving fitness.

Read More

Does Pyrrole Disorder Affect Your Energy, Stress or Mood?

Pyrrole disorder, pyrroluria or “Mauve Factor” was first identified in the 1950s by Dr Abram Hoffer. Some people have persistent elevated levels due to abnormal haemoglobin metabolism or synthesis. Elevated pyrroles have been linked with mood disorders such as bipolar disorder, anxiety and depression. Stress, nutritional deficiency, and heavy metals such as lead and mercury can significantly increase pyrrole levels.

Read More

Natural Medication to Boost Your Mood

Anxiety and depression are common concerns for many of my patients and certainly affect millions of people in our country and around the world. Natural remedies can help address stress, anxiety and depression. They can also be used to help support people taking pharmaceutical antidepressants.

Read More